Electroacoustic assessment of wireless remote microphone systems

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Haniyeh Salehi (1*), Vijay Parsa (2), Paula Folkeard (3)

1 Electrical and Computer Engineering; National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
2 Electrical and Computer Engineering; National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
3 National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
(*) Corresponding Author:
Haniyeh Salehi
hsalehi@uwo.ca

Abstract

Wireless remote microphones (RMs) transmit the desired acoustic signal to the hearing aid (HA) and facilitate enhanced listening in challenging environments. Fitting and verification of RMs, and benchmarking the relative performance of different RM devices in varied acoustic environments are of significant interest to Audiologists and RM developers. This paper investigates the application of instrumental speech intelligibility and quality metrics for characterizing the RM performance in two acoustic environments with varying amounts of background noise and reverberation. In both environments, two head and torso simulators (HATS) were placed 2 m apart, where one HATS served as the talker and the other served as the listener. Four RM systems were interfaced separately with a HA programmed to match the prescriptive targets for the N4 standard audiogram and placed on the listener HATS. The HA output in varied acoustic conditions was recorded and analyzed offline through computational models predicting speech intelligibility and quality. Results showed performance differences among the four RMs in the presence of noise and/or reverberation, with one RM exhibiting significantly better performance. Clinical implications and applications of these results are discussed.


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How to Cite
Salehi, H., Parsa, V., & Folkeard, P. (2018). Electroacoustic assessment of wireless remote microphone systems. Audiology Research, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.204