https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/issue/feed Audiology Research 2019-06-15T15:49:58+02:00 Francesca Baccino francesca.baccino@pagepress.org Open Journal Systems <p><strong>Audiology Research</strong> is an international, peer-reviewed, open access Journal designed to be a place where the readers will quickly and clearly find up-to-date and high-quality information related to the Audiology and Neurotology field in a broad sense, including the study, early detection, diagnosis and treatment of all conditions of hearing and balance impairment and audiological and neurotological disorders. Papers ranging from the medical/clinical perspective to the basic and experimental research are encouraged for submission. Papers are welcomed in multiple areas including, but not limited to: Disorders of hearing and balance and neurotology, Balance and Hearing Diagnostic tests, treatments for audiological and balance disorders, Rehabilitative procedures, Genetics, Anatomy and Physiology, Psychoacoustics, Speech and Hearing sciences, Vestibular disorders, Neuroscience and Audiology, Epidemiology, Statistics, Engineering. Audiology Research aims to be the forum for discussion on Audiology and Neurotology for a diverse range of professionals, including researchers, clinicians, technicians, officers from health authorities, healthcare administrators.</p> https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/222 Tinnitus and suicide: An unresolved relation 2019-06-15T15:49:51+02:00 Annett Szibor ext-annett.szibor@hus.fi Antti Mäkitie antti.makitie@hus.fi Antti A. Aarnisalo antti.aarnisalo@hus.fi <p>Tinnitus is an auditory phantom sensation which can be a devastating condition for the affected person causing annoyance and discomfort. It may be associated with psychiatric conditions. Patients with highly annoying tinnitus and different comorbidities may have a higher risk of expressing suicidal behaviour and ideation. We aimed to review available reports on the prevalence of suicide and suicidal behaviour with tinnitus patients in order to collate current concepts and to identify possible alarming signs and risk factors. A comprehensive search for appropriate studies listed in PubMed, Ovid and Cochrane databases was conducted using appropriate keyword combinations. We identified 22 publications including original articles, case reports and reviews of which 10 fit our stringent search criteria. Most importantly, from the present studies it appears not feasible to univocally conclude on the co-incidence of tinnitus and suicide. This is due to methodological differences in these approaches, complex interrelations between tinnitus and other psychiatric comorbidities and confounding factors such as the inclusion of patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. More concerted actions involving different medical disciplines are needed to reflect the ethiological heterogeneity of tinnitus and suicide or suicidal behaviour to test for a relationship.</p> 2019-06-07T11:17:18+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/219 Effectiveness and efficiency of a dedicated bimodal fitting formula 2019-06-15T15:49:52+02:00 Domenico Cuda d.cuda@ausl.pc.it Alessandra Murri alessandra_murri@libero.it Anna Mainardi a.mainardi@ausl.pc.it Josef Chalupper josef.chalupper@advancedbionics.com <p>The population of unilateral cochlear implant (CI) users with aidable residual hearing in the contralateral ear is continuously growing. Aiding the contralateral ear with a hearing aid has been shown to provide substantial benefit regarding speech intelligibility in quiet and in noise, sound quality, localization ability and listening effort. In this study, a dedicated hearing aid with the accompanying fitting prescription, tailored to the needs of bimodal listeners was evaluated in nine bimodal CI users. Speech intelligibility scores in noise revealed on-par performance of the dedicated bimodal fitting compared to the clinical standard prescription. 78% of the bimodal CI users preferred the dedicated bimodal fitting over the clinical standard. The minimal subject-specific finetuning effort required during the dedicated bimodal fitting process emphasizes the clinical efficiency.</p> 2019-05-09T11:47:00+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/217 Vocalization frequency as a prognostic marker of language development following early cochlear implantation 2019-06-15T15:49:53+02:00 Paris Binos p.binos@ucl.ac.uk Elena Loizou elena85cy@yahoo.gr <p>Despite their potential significance for later linguistic outcomes, early aspects of vocalization had been seriously undervalued in the past, and thus, minimally investigated until relatively recently. The present article sets out to critically examine existing evidence to: i) ascertain whether vocalization frequency (volubility) posits a plausible marker of cochlear implantation success in infancy, and ii) determine the clinical usefulness of post-implementation vocalization frequency data in predicting later language development. Only recent peer-reviewed articles with substantial impact on vocalization growth during the first year of life, examining sound production characteristics of normally hearing (NH) and hearing impaired infants fitted with cochlear implantation (CI) were mentioned. Recorded differences in linguistic performance among NH and CI infants are typically attributed to auditory deprivation. Infants who have undergone late CI, produce fewer syllables (low volubility) and exhibit late-onset babbling, especially those who received their CIs at the age of 12 months or thereafter. Contrarily, early recipients (before the 12-month of age) exhibit higher volubility (more vocalizations), triggered from CI-initiated auditory feedback. In other words, early CI provides infants with early auditory access to speech sounds, leading to advanced forms of babbling and increased post-implementation vocalization frequency. Current findings suggest vocalization frequency as a plausible criterion of the success of early CI. It is argued that vocalization frequency predicts language development and affects habilitation therapy.</p> 2019-05-06T11:31:34+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/216 Free-field evoked auditory brainstem responses in cochlear implant users 2019-06-15T15:49:54+02:00 Erik Schebsdat schebsdat@snn-unit.de Manuel C. Kohl kohl@snn-unit.de Farah I. Corona-Strauss farah.coronastrauss@uni-saarland.de Harald Seidler seidler@snn-unit.de Daniel J. Strauss daniel.strauss@uni-saarland.de <p>The importance of binaural cues in auditory stream formation and sound source segregation is widely accepted. When treating one ear with a cochlear implant (CI) the peripheral auditory system gets partially replaced and processing delays get added potentially, thus important interaural time differences get altered. However, these effects are not fully understood, leaving a lack of systematic binaural fitting strategies with respect to an optimal binaural fusion. To get new insights into such alterations, we suggest a novel method of free-field auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) analysis in CI users. This method does not bypass the technically induced intrinsic delays of the sound processor while leaving the whole electrode array active, thus the most natural way of stimulation is provided. We compared the ABRs collected of 12 CI users and 12 normal hearing listeners using two different stimuli (chirp, click) at four different intensities each. We analyzed the ABRs using the average of 2000 trials as well as a single trial analysis and found consistent results in the ABRs’ amplitudes and latencies, as well as in single trial relationships between both groups. This method provides a new perspective into the natural CI users’ ABRs and can be useful in future research regarding binaural interaction and fusion.</p> 2018-12-07T09:20:46+01:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/215 Effects of directional hearing aid settings on different laboratory measures of spatial awareness perception 2019-06-15T15:49:54+02:00 Micha Lundbeck micha.lundbeck@uni-oldenburg.de Giso Grimm g.grimm@uni-oldenburg.de Volker Hohmann volker.hohmann@uni-oldenburg.de Lars Bramsløw labw@eriksholm.com Tobias Neher tneher@health.sdu.dk <p>Hearing loss can negatively influence the spatial hearing abilities of hearing-impaired listeners, not only in static but also in dynamic auditory environments. Therefore, ways of addressing these deficits with advanced hearing aid algorithms need to be investigated. In a previous study based on virtual acoustics and a computer simulation of different bilateral hearing aid fittings, we investigated auditory source movement detectability in older hearing- impaired (OHI) listeners. We found that two directional processing algorithms could substantially improve the detectability of left-right and near-far source movements in the presence of reverberation and multiple interfering sounds. In the current study, we carried out similar measurements with a loudspeaker-based setup and wearable hearing aids. We fitted a group of 15 OHI listeners with bilateral behind-the-ear devices that were programmed to have three different directional processing settings. Apart from source movement detectability, we assessed two other aspects of spatial awareness perception. Using a street scene with up to five environmental sound sources, the participants had to count the number of presented sources or to indicate the movement direction of a single target signal. The data analyses showed a clear influence of the number of concurrent sound sources and the starting position of the moving target signal on the participants’ performance, but no influence of the different hearing aid settings. Complementary artificial head recordings showed that the acoustic differences between the three hearing aid settings were rather small. Another explanation for the lack of effects of the tested hearing aid settings could be that the simulated street scenario was not sufficiently sensitive. Possible ways of improving the sensitivity of the laboratory measures while maintaining high ecological validity and complexity are discussed.</p> 2018-11-21T12:10:29+01:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/214 Normal hearing young adults with mild tinnitus: Reduced inhibition as measured through sensory gating 2019-06-15T15:49:55+02:00 Julia Campbell julia.campbell@austin.utexas.edu Connor Bean connormariebean@gmail.com Alison LaBrec alisonlabrec@utexas.edu <p>Decreased central inhibition, possibly related to hearing loss, may contribute to chronic tinnitus. However, many individuals with normal hearing thresholds report tinnitus, suggesting that the percept in this population may arise from sources other than peripheral deafferentation. One measure of inhibition is sensory gating. Sensory gating involves the suppression of non-novel input, and is measured through cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) responses to paired stimuli. In typical gating function, amplitude suppression is observed in the second CAEP response when compared to the first CAEP response, illustrating inhibitory activity. Using this measure, we investigated central inhibitory processes in normal hearing young adults with and without mild tinnitus to determine whether inhibition may be a contributing factor to the tinnitus percept. Results showed that gating function was impaired in the tinnitus group, with the CAEP Pa component significantly correlated with tinnitus severity. Further exploratory analyses were conducted to evaluate variability in gating function within the tinnitus group, and findings showed that high CAEP amplitude suppressors demonstrated gating performance comparable to adults without tinnitus, while low amplitude suppressors exhibited atypical gating function.</p> 2018-10-02T16:41:27+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/212 State-of-the-art assessment allows for improved vestibular evoked myogenic potential test-retest reliability 2019-06-15T15:49:56+02:00 Lydia Behtani behtani03@gmail.com Maxime Maheu maxime.maheu@outlook.com Audrey Delcenserie audrey.delcenserie@umontreal.ca Mujda Nooristani mujdanooristani26@gmail.com François Champoux francois.champoux@umontreal.ca <p>The goal of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability values of myogenic responses using the latest guidelines for vestibular assessment. Twenty-two otologically and neurologically normal adults were assessed twice, on two different days. The analyses were carried out using interclass correlations. The results showed that the latest recommendations for vestibular assessment lead to test-retest reliability values that are as high, or greater, than those reported in previous studies. The results suggest that state-of-the-art testing, using the latest recommendations as well as electromyography control, improves reliability values of myogenic responses, more specifically for the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. The impact of small differences in experimental procedures on the reliability values of myogenic responses is also addressed.</p> 2018-09-20T00:00:00+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/200 Asymmetric hearing loss and chronic dizziness in a patient with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus 2019-06-15T15:49:56+02:00 Theodoros Varakliotis theo_va@hotmail.com Federico Maspes federicomaspes@katamail.com Vittoria Di Rubbo dirubbovittoria@gmail.com Sara Cisternino sara.cisternino@gmail.com Maria Lauriello lauriellomaria@gmail.com Elisa Vitti elisavitti@gmail.com Alberto Eibenstein eibenstein@libero.it <p>We report a case of a 54-year old female patient, complaining for chronic dizziness, hearing loss, tension headaches without aura, postural instability and gait dysfunction. The patient referred having these symptoms from 1992, but the last few months she experienced a noticeable aggravation of the symptoms. A magnetic resonance imaging test revealed a triventricular hydrocephalus, not associated with signs of intracranial hypertension decompensation. The ENT-Audiology evaluation revealed a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with a conductive component, video-nystagmography resulted in an areflexia of the right ear and a reduced vestibular activity for the left ear. Auditory brainstem response test was also carried out and showed pathologic findings for the latencies of the waves I-III, III-V and I-V bilaterally but more significant in the right ear. On January 2016 the patient had endoscopic third ventriculostomy. On the follow up the patient referred an important subjective improvement regarding instability and gait dysfunction. In this paper we study the correlation between hydrocephalus, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction.</p> 2018-06-06T10:23:05+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/198 Awareness of musicians on ear protection and tinnitus: A preliminary study 2019-06-15T15:49:57+02:00 Tychicus Dinakaran debi_vlr@yahoo.co.in Ruth Deborah D. debi_vlr@yahoo.co.in Chitra RejoyThadathil debi_vlr@yahoo.co.in <p>Music induced hearing loss (MIHL) is linked to chronic, extended exposure, and progress at a rate proportionate to exposure conditions. The aim was to document hearing deterioration; awareness of ear protection devices (EPDs); presence of tinnitus, measurement of temporary threshold shift. Thirty-four musicians filled a questionnaire regarding: years of experience, instrument/splayed, hours of music exposure per week with/without amplification, through earphones and speakers, use of EPDs and tinnitus. Hearing screening in five subjects was done before and after one hour and ten minutes of practice session. Among the participants, 8.8% reported hearing deterioration subjectively and 38.2% reported unilateral intermittent tinnitus, 79.4% lacked awareness about EPDs and 21.6 % were aware but never used them. Mean for temporary threshold shift at 500 Hz and 1 KHz was 5dB HL and 10dBHL at 2 KHz. Musicians are at risk for hearing problems, but the awareness on auditory damage is limited, hence conservative measures must be taken for their well being.</p> 2018-05-23T16:36:06+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement## https://www.audiologyresearch.org/index.php/audio/article/view/206 Vestibular paroxysmia in vestibular neuritis: A case report 2019-06-15T15:49:58+02:00 Michele Ori michele.ori357@gmail.com Valeria Gambacorta gambacortavaleria@gmail.com Giampietro Ricci giampietro.ricci@unipg.it Mario Faralli mario.far@hotmail.it <p>The term vestibular paroxysmia (VP) was introduced for the first time by Brandt and Dieterich in 1994. In 2016, the Barany Society formulated the International Classification of VP, focusing in particular on the number and duration of attacks, on the differential diagnosis and on the therapy. Ephaptic discharges in the proximal part of the eighth cranial nerve, which is covered by oligodendrocytes, are assumed to be the neural basis of VP. We report the first case in literature of an onset of symptoms and signs typical of VP in a young man following acute unilateral vestibular loss not combined with auditory symptoms. Indeed, the pathogenic mechanism affected only the vestibular nerve as confirmed by the presence of a stereotyped nystagmus pattern. The magnetic resonance imaging didn’t reveal any specific cause therefore we suggest the possible role of a neuritis triggering an ephaptic discharge as the neural mechanism of VP.</p> 2018-05-11T00:00:00+02:00 ##submission.copyrightStatement##